April 23, 2014

tastygravy:

everyone please watch this video this is humanity in it’s purest form

(via wheniwasayoungtaco)

April 22, 2014
directingfilm:

What’s Wrong with Your Screenplay? An Infographic

The scriptreader listed 37 frequently occurring problems, here are the top 20:
The story begins too late in the script
The scenes are void of meaningful conflict
The script has a by-the-numbers execution
The story is too thin
The villains are cartoonish, evil-for-the-sake-of-evil
The character logic is muddy
The female part is underwritten
The narrative falls into a repetitive pattern
The conflict is inconsequential, flash-in-the-pan
The protagonist is a standard issue hero
The script favors style over substance
The ending is completely anti-climactic
The characters are all stereotypes
The script suffers from arbitrary complexity
The script goes off the rails in the third act
The script’s questions are left unanswered
The story is a string of unrelated vignettes
The plot unravels through convenience/contrivance
The script is tonally confused
The protagonist is not as strong as [he or she needs to] be
In a way, while the information about script problems is helpful, there’s a ton more information included here. Like the fact that 270 of the scripts were written by male writer(s). Or that only 2 scripts took place in outer space. Or that the most common location for these films-in-waiting was “some anonymous small town,” which just narrowly edged out its exact opposite, a place called “New York City.”
So here’s to more space, less anonymous small towns.
via io9 and CoCreate

~ thefilmfatale

directingfilm:

What’s Wrong with Your Screenplay? An Infographic

The scriptreader listed 37 frequently occurring problems, here are the top 20:

  1. The story begins too late in the script
  2. The scenes are void of meaningful conflict
  3. The script has a by-the-numbers execution
  4. The story is too thin
  5. The villains are cartoonish, evil-for-the-sake-of-evil
  6. The character logic is muddy
  7. The female part is underwritten
  8. The narrative falls into a repetitive pattern
  9. The conflict is inconsequential, flash-in-the-pan
  10. The protagonist is a standard issue hero
  11. The script favors style over substance
  12. The ending is completely anti-climactic
  13. The characters are all stereotypes
  14. The script suffers from arbitrary complexity
  15. The script goes off the rails in the third act
  16. The script’s questions are left unanswered
  17. The story is a string of unrelated vignettes
  18. The plot unravels through convenience/contrivance
  19. The script is tonally confused
  20. The protagonist is not as strong as [he or she needs to] be

In a way, while the information about script problems is helpful, there’s a ton more information included here. Like the fact that 270 of the scripts were written by male writer(s). Or that only 2 scripts took place in outer space. Or that the most common location for these films-in-waiting was “some anonymous small town,” which just narrowly edged out its exact opposite, a place called “New York City.”

So here’s to more space, less anonymous small towns.

via io9 and CoCreate

~ thefilmfatale

April 21, 2014

Jack CardiffBlack Narcissus, The Red Shoes
"When I was about nine, one of the schools I attended while accompanying my parents on tour organized a trip to a provincial art gallery. I had never seen a painting before, and suddenly I was in this vast chamber filled with these wondrous color dreams. That really got to me, and thereafter, wherever I traveled with my parents, I went to as many museums as I could. Painters were my childhood heroes, and as I studied their work, I began to realize that it was all about light."

Kazuo MiyagawaRashomon, Ugetsu
"[In my house in Kyoto] there was a backyard right behind a completely dark kitchen. The sunlight came through a window on the ceiling, which made only the well bucket in the backyard shine. Such a view that I saw when I was a child left an unexpectedly strong impression on my mind… even though I was one of those children who were so shy that they would not go outside but stayed in a dark corner of the house."

Subrata MitraPather Panchali, Charulata
"Little did I know that my habitual cycling down with schoolmates to a nearby cinema for the Sunday morning shows, to watch British and Hollywood films from our lowest-priced seats, would secretly decide my fate. I was discovering the magic of film and was fascinated by the dramatic images with low-key lighting in Guy Green’s photography for Great Expectations and Oliver Twist, or Robert Krasker’s for The Third Man. I became aware of the medium of cinematography and the urge to become a cameraman was sown.”

Emmanuel LubezkiChildren of Men, The Tree of Life
"My parents took me to see movies when I was a boy. I remember watching Italian movies and films from America without reading the subtitles. I was always interested in watching the images, even if I didn’t understand the words… [In high school] all the people in one class spent a full year working together on the production of a documentary that dealt with everything from social classes to natural science. We went to Vera Cruz and made a documentary about workers in the sugar cane fields. Other people were interested in doing the research and journalism; for me, the magic moment happened when I was looking through the viewfinder on a Super 8 camera and shooting the film."

Mark Lee Ping-binIn the Mood for Love, Millennium Mambo
"When I was a kid, every day after school I’d catch my mom get busy, run off to the cinema near our home, hide behind an adult’s ass and sneak inside. Every time I got home, mom would get furious. ‘Where have you disappeared to?’ For punishment she made me kneel before father’s memorial tablet. Cinema is fantasy. As a child I had nothing, so I was always dreaming, and going to the movies for comfort."

Agnès GodardBeau Travail, Bastards
"[My family] wasn’t particularly connected to movies or photography but I’ve always been fascinated by images. My father, a taciturn man, expressed himself through the family pictures he took. To this day I find family pictures particularly troubling and moving, because they’re made out of love, not for commercial reasons… I had the feeling that you could tell a story through pictures. When I was at school I was very shy and knew that I could not write a script, but when we had to shoot short films I became very excited and decided to listen to my inner voice."

(Source: strangewood)

April 21, 2014

It takes time in the morning for me to become George, time to adjust to what is expected of George and how he is to behave. By the time I have dressed and put the final layer of polish on the now slightly stiff but quite perfect George, I know fully what part I’m supposed to play.

"That particular scene, where George is dressing in the morning, is not something that’s in the book, but George is distraught. He’s in a terrible, terrible, deep depression. When I am in a terrible, deep depression, one of the things that I do is put on a suit. It might be false, but I feel like if I shine my shoes, I put on a tie, I make myself look as good as I can possibly look, that I feel better, that somehow it’s armour. It’s a ritual that I go through." - Tom Ford

(Source: theworldofcinema, via samuel-l-changz)

April 21, 2014
gifcraft:

Going to School

gifcraft:

Going to School

(Source: dovga.com, via benesmauglocked)

April 20, 2014

tracylord:

Bette Davis’ bloopers

(via samuel-l-changz)

April 13, 2014

fuckindiva:

My Generation, according to Pete Townshend, who wrote it, “was very much about trying to find a place in society”. Perhaps the most striking element of the song are the lyrics, considered one of the most distilled statements of youthful rebellion in rock history. The tone of the track alone helped make it an acknowledged forebear of the punk rock movement. One of the most-quoted—and patently rewritten—lines in rock history is “I hope I die before I get old”, famously sneered by lead singer Roger Daltrey. Another salient aspect of “My Generation” is Daltrey’s delivery: an angry and frustrated stutter. Various stories exist as to the reason for it, one is that Daltrey stuttered to sound like a British mod on speed. The song also featured one of the first bass solos in rock history, played by John Entwistle. It was named the 11th greatest song by Rolling Stone on their list of the 500 Greatest Songs of All Timex

(via superblackmarket)

April 11, 2014

fruit4thought:

the godfather himself

(Source: marlonsbrandos, via lifejustgotawkward)

April 11, 2014

(Source: avessiunaltromodo, via perks-of-being-chinese)

April 8, 2014

(Source: sadgasim, via rad-feminist)

April 8, 2014

pizzzatime:

Jonas GinterFirst attempt to create a 360° spherical panorama video using 6 GoPro Cameras in 3D printed mount. - More Information here: jonasginter.de/360-grad-video-mit-6-gopro-kameras/

April 7, 2014

Let’s Talk About Movies:

BLOOD(y) SCENES
Some of the most iconic movie scenes may grosses you out - or left you chanting, ‘More! more!’

The use of blood on silver screen can be interpret in many ways. Is it an act of revenge? rebellion? brutality? or simply an act of a Psycho? For some, blood can be manipulated to be visually interesting such as the blood splatter on a delicate flower in Stoker. Or to create a sentiment to an object - such as the blood-covered polaroid in Battle Royale. Also, who can forget the iconic blood splashing on pretty prom queen Carrie? Like it or not, blood has been one of the most used key visual in the history of films, especially the bloody good ones!

(via pawsthomasanderson)

April 5, 2014

country-winnie-marshall:

Mumford and Sons - I’m On Fire @ 2013 MusiCares Person of the Year concert film honoring Bruce Springsteen

(via mumfordandsonsblog)

April 4, 2014

(Source: ceinwen92, via pawsthomasanderson)

April 3, 2014

(Source: shinjurou, via v-inessa)

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